REVIEW: Sausage Party

Image: Columbia Pictures

Image: Columbia Pictures

Chris Luckett

There hasn’t been as obscenely ribald an animated comedy as Sausage Party to hit theatres since South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut, which is fitting. As South Park’s creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone have demonstrated first hand for nearly two decades, the easiest way to get people to accept subversive intelligence and bold truths is to bury them under obscenities, innuendoes, and fart jokes.

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REVIEW: Ghostbusters (2016)

Photo: Sony Pictures Releasing

Photo: Sony Pictures Releasing

Chris Luckett

If there was ever a movie this year that seemed destined to fail, it was Ghostbusters. Long before the reboot’s dissenters became an online horde, spewing vitriol and misogyny, the long and the short is that director Paul Feig was attempting to remake what is unequivocally considered to be one of the strongest comedies ever filmed.

No property or piece of art is so sacred that it’s above reinterpretation, though, as long as the execution is strong enough to support to new angle. (West Side Story, Gnomeo & Juliet, and 1996’s Romeo + Juliet are all far cries from what Shakespeare envisioned, but each still works due to that factor.)

The fact that four women would play the busting quartet was never going to be what killed a Ghostbusters remake — particularly when they were four incredibly funny women. The key would always be whether Feig could make the movie enough of his own creation. Mostly, he does. It’s only whenever the reboot feels forced to tip its hat in homage to the original that it loses its own voice. Continue reading

REVIEW: The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (2013)

Photo: Twentieth Century Fox

Photo: Twentieth Century Fox

Chris Luckett

1947’s The Secret Life of Walter Mitty was designed as nothing more than a showcase for Danny Kaye’s comedic talents, with the boring protagonist constantly daydreaming extended sequences wherein Kaye could play various wacky characters. Ben Stiller’s remake improves on the original by making Mitty’s actual story more interesting and rewarding, but the movie is still hindered by toothlessness and predictability. Continue reading

REVIEW: Despicable Me 2

Artwork: Universal Pictures

Artwork: Universal Pictures

Chris Luckett

A charmingly hilarious animated movie came out in 2010 about a villain, voiced by a popular comedian, who learned how much more satisfying life is when you choose love over world domination.

That movie was Megamind.

Despicable Me was also good, but traded sharp comedy and classic timing for toothless action and overly cute children. (It was the Monsters, Inc. to Megamind’s Shrek, if you will.) Even so, it made over $250 million, so audiences are now treated to Despicable Me 2. Continue reading