REVIEW: Snowden

Image: Open Road Films

Image: Open Road Films

Chris Luckett

A year ago, Joseph Gordon-Levitt starred in The Walk. Adapted from the same you-wouldn’t-believe-it-if-it-weren’t-true tale as 2008’s Oscar-winning documentary Man on Wire, The Walk was a biopic of tightrope-walker Philippe Petit that fictionalized the events that’d been shown in documentary footage less than a decade earlier.

What saved it from feeling like an unnecessary re-tread — besides Gordon-Levitt’s strong performance — was the skill of legendary director Robert Zemeckis, who made the crazy true story feel even more real than the documentary footage.

Now here we are one year later, with Joseph Gordon-Levitt starring in Snowden, adapted from the you-wouldn’t-believe-it-if-it-weren’t-true tale as 2014’s Oscar-winning documentary Citizenfour. Once again, Gordon-Levitt’s performance gives the movie a strong anchor. Director Oliver Stone, though, can’t pull off the same daring feat as Zemeckis.

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CORE STORY: Final Divergent movie skipping theatres

Photo: E1 Films/Lionsgate

Photo: E1 Films/Lionsgate

Chris Luckett

Lionsgate, the small studio that went big when it bought the rights to Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games, acquired Veronica Roth’s Divergent three-book series to carry the torch once Katniss Everdeen had fired her last arrow. 

Three-quarters into the film tetralogy, the studio is now pulling the last movie in the series, Ascendant, from its planned theatrical release next year, in lieu of a release on television.

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REVIEW: The Fault in Our Stars

Photo: Twentieth Century Fox

Photo: Twentieth Century Fox

Chris Luckett

In the last decade, a younger, more self-aware and honest brand of indie romance movie has emerged. These movies, like Garden State, Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist, 500 Days of Summer, and The Spectacular Now, combine quirky characters, hip soundtracks, melancholic atmospheres, and poetic imagery to create rewarding and powerful movies, far removed from derided Nicholas Sparks adaptations like The Last Song or Safe Haven. Despite its Sparksian premise, The Fault in Our Stars belongs in the same breath as those four modern classics.

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